Archive | BC agriculture

Kootenay Fruit Growing and Falkland Community Cookbook

Kootenay Fruit Growing and the Falkland Community Cookbook are the topics of the latest book reviews.  For more book reviews, go to: http://www.bcfoodhistory.ca/food-history-resources/book-reviews/ Lost orchards, vanishing fruit farms of the West Kootenays began as a thesis by Joan Lang in the History Department at The University of Victoria in 1996.  It documents the development and decline […]

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Big Cheese Stories

Jason Allard, Hudson Bay Company clerk, and James W. Robertson, Canadian Dairy Commissioner,  contributed to some of the folklore that surrounds “big cheese”. Allard’s Cheese Jason Allard (1848-1931)  was born at Fort Langley, BC, the son of Ovid Allard and Justine Cowichan, the sister of a Cowichan confederacy chief T’Soshia.  His biographer, Bruce McKelvie, described him […]

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Chicken Sexing in BC

Chicken sexing is an important part of egg production in BC and most commercial hatcheries employ chicken sexers who separate pullets from cockerels within a day or so of hatching.  This is necessary because different feed is needed for female chicks who will lay eggs one day versus male chicks who may or may not […]

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Hospital Food

Hospital Food of the Past While there is a claim that hospital food is being revolutionized[i] by sourcing and preparing more local, nutritious food, a friend who recently spent some time in a BC hospital described the food as “downright awful.” We are reminded especially in the Okanagan that the soil is productive and at […]

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How Honeybees Came to BC

It’s almost Valentine’s Day when sugar and sweetness abound, whether you celebrate the occasion or not.  This blog is going to focus on honeybees, whose hard work producing honey is critically important to agriculture and food production in British Columbia. Right now there is a lot of interest in bees because they pollinate plants that […]

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Groundhog Day

February 2 is more than Groundhog Day. It is a cross-quarter day that was important for the ancient Celts who marked the days that were halfway between solstice and an equinox [i]. Halfway between December 21 and March 21 is February 2, which is called Candlemas in addition to Groundhog Day. Halfway between March 21 […]

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